Our favorite VP Solution Engineering Eric Mizell gave a talk at DevNexus this year, and we think he rocked it, so naturally we have to share with all of you. (Skip to the bottom to watch right away.)

In this session, Eric covers the concept of Continuous Reliability, from what it is and what makes it hard to achieve, to actionable steps you can take to introduce it to your own workflow.

You’re probably familiar with the following Venn diagram, or at least one that looks very similar.

It’s commonly used to present the idea that teams are generally forced to choose two and sacrifice the third. Eric defines Continuous Reliability as that small triangle in the middle, the seemingly impossible-to-achieve balance between speed, quality AND complexity.

There are many different challenges that we need to overcome to reach this level. That’s why most of us are compromising and going for a “best 2 out of 3” approach. Some of the challenges that Eric lays out include:

  • Technical Debt
  • 3rd-Party Code
  • Dev vs. Ops Finger-Pointing
  • Manual Mistakes
  • Lack of Visibility/Observability

Not to worry, though – he also lays out the path to Continuous Reliability. Without delving too deep into each individual step, here are the points that he brings up as the most important areas to address when Continuous Reliability is your goal:

  • Automation, automation, automation (reduce human intervention as much as possible)
  • Know your unknowns (identify what you don’t know)
  • Identify errors sooner (shift left, test early and often)
  • Capture more context (logs don’t give full context)
  • Create more/better code coverage (new or better tooling)
  • Better data usage (metrics hub to leverage all available data)
  • Culture of Accountability (accountability for everyone on the team)

Watch the video to get the full scoop on achieving the impossible and adding Continuous Reliability to your workflow!

For more information on how OverOps can help you achieve Continuous Reliability – visit our website!

Tali has a degree in theoretical mathematics and covers topics related to software monitoring challenges. In her free time, Tali enjoys drawing, practicing yoga and spending time with animals.